Over a person’s lifetime, how much do you expect that their happiness will increase?

Most people I’ve asked seem to think that the answer is ‘A LOT’.

Sure, there’ll be tough times and the occasional sadness, but as they accomplish and accumulate, their happiness will go up and up and up.

FALSE.

Most people die a few percentage points happier than they were as children. Marriage, employment, friendship, growth… all it results in is a few percentage points of change.

No surprise. Happiness is counter-intuitive.

One study tracked the same individuals over the span of 20 years. At the end, most were just a small bit happier than they were at the start.

But there were exceptions! Their baseline level of happiness increase by 20, 30, even 50% over the course of those 20 years.

Those exceptions were few, with less than 5% of the people studied showing changes of that magnitude. But they existed.

You can choose to follow the whims of your desire. You can choose to follow the idealizations of your culture. You’ll end up like the 95% who ended up just a bit happier than they started.

Or you can follow the exceptions. Act with intention, informed by science. End up 50% happier.

Here are 54 things you can do to be more like them:
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Every single feeling of perception – of touch, of smell, of color – can be traced back to a particular set of neurons.

Stimulate those neurons directly and a person’s perception of reality can be controlled.

In the 1940s, neurosurgeon Wilder Penfield experimented with the brains of his patients. He sent mild electric shocks to their somatosensory cortex.

As a result, they felt as if their body was being touched even when it wasn’t. A shock to one area, a feeling of their arm being pushed, a shock to another and a feeling of their upper lip being nipped.

Science fiction takes brain stimulation technology to its extreme – fully immersive virtual reality. Want the user to feel as if he’s actually boxing, not just waving his hands in the air? Sense his arm and body movements. Then stimulate the neurons responsible for his fist and arm when he gives a hit and the neurons responsible for his head and nose when he takes one.

But why limit direct stimulation of the brain to physical perception?

Stimulate the brain’s happiness centers and BAM – you’ve got happiness on demand.

You can purchase a direct brain stimulation device online, plunk it on your head, pick a brain region, get zapping, and enhance your mood, memory, and attention.

You can spend 25 years working hard in order to make your life perfect and finally get those happiness neurons firing as much as you want, or just maybe, you can use tDCS for 25 days.

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Overthinking is evil.

Like the whispers of a devil, it pretends to help while just making the situation worse.

What can you do to reduce it?

Unfortunately, the cure is as complex as the cause.

But follow these 7 steps and you can slowly but surely rid yourself of the poison known as overthinking.

Step 0 – Get Treatment if Depressed
Step 1 – Understand That You Can Influence Your Emotions
Step 2 – Accept That Overthinking Won’t Give You an Insight
Step 3 – Know When You’re Overthinking
Step 4 – Ignore Your Rationalizations
Step 5 – Assert Control
Step 6 – Distract Yourself
Step 7 – Tackle The Problem

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It’s an idea repeated so often that it’s now taken for fact – depression is on the rise.

If true, modern society has messed up.

In 1985, 10% of people had no one to discuss important matters with. By 2004, that number had grown to 25% – one out of every four people! (1)

We’re spending less time with other people, eating worse food, and getting less exercise, sunlight, and sleep.

Surely the rate of depression has gone up.

My father disagrees.

Normally that wouldn’t mean anything to me – he believes lots of crazy things. But he’s a psychiatrist.

Psychiatrists are the ones who invented the scientific study of mental dysfunction.

The field has problems. But they base many of their beliefs off of empirical evidence, not armchair philosophizing, like what used to be common (think Freud and penis envy).

Psychiatry has insights to offer.

Is the idea that the rise of depression is more media sensationalization than hard journalism one of them?

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UPDATE: THE PRICE OF THE COURSE MENTIONED IN THIS POST HAS INCREASED BY 200%. I NO LONGER RECOMMEND THIS PRODUCT

What do the most successful people do differently?

Why are some people able to bounce back from failure?

What allows some couples to stay happily together for many decades?

What do very happy people do differently?

These are the questions asked by the science of positive psychology.

Through the efforts of hundreds of scientists conducting thousands of experiments, case studies and analyses we’ve started getting answers – insights into how we can become happier.

Happier Human was created to make those insights accessible. So that you can improve your life and the lives of others.

Most of what I produce is free, but at the end of the day I’ve got to be able to eat and pay rent.
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More and more people are getting fat.

From the growing waistlines and rates of cardiovascular disease it’s obvious.

We call it the obesity epidemic.

But there’s another epidemic that’s been spreading that’s just as bad.

Why is the rate of depression on the rise?

Why do we feel more stressed than ever before?

There’s an overthinking epidemic.

20% of Baby Boomers, 52% of Gen Xers, and 73% of Gen Yers are overthinkers. (1)

Less than 27% of people younger than 30 remain healthy!

This is part two of a three part series on overthinking. In part two, you’ll learn four of the reasons this virus has been getting worse, infecting more and more of the population.

  1. Quick fixes work.
  2. Chronic stressors are on the rise.
  3. Dreaming comes with a cost.
  4. Introspection has gone too far.


Read part one to take the Are You an Overthinker quiz and find out why overthinking is so dangerous.

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